Entrepreneurship course – Shiawase Win http://shiawase-win.com/ Mon, 20 Jun 2022 18:12:09 +0000 en-US hourly 1 https://wordpress.org/?v=5.9.3 https://shiawase-win.com/wp-content/uploads/2022/01/profile-30-150x150.png Entrepreneurship course – Shiawase Win http://shiawase-win.com/ 32 32 How an Online Entrepreneurship Course Can Help You Get Startup Funding (Sponsored Content by James) https://shiawase-win.com/how-an-online-entrepreneurship-course-can-help-you-get-startup-funding-sponsored-content-by-james/ Mon, 20 Jun 2022 11:23:00 +0000 https://shiawase-win.com/how-an-online-entrepreneurship-course-can-help-you-get-startup-funding-sponsored-content-by-james/ Image: Maranda Vandergriff on Unsplash.com Almost all startups will need external funding sooner or later. Although it seems like a simple process, obtaining start-up funding is rather difficult because new entrepreneurs rarely have formal training in fundraising for their business. Attracting and negotiating with investors is a crucial skill that must be developed if you […]]]>
Image: Maranda Vandergriff on Unsplash.com

Almost all startups will need external funding sooner or later. Although it seems like a simple process, obtaining start-up funding is rather difficult because new entrepreneurs rarely have formal training in fundraising for their business. Attracting and negotiating with investors is a crucial skill that must be developed if you want to maximize the value of a deal.

Being a powerful deal facilitator allows you to negotiate better prices to maximize the value of service agreements, which ultimately benefits your organization’s finances. A online entrepreneurship course prepares budding and active entrepreneurs with the ability to obtain financing for their business. It elucidates several key financial concepts that can be used to negotiate better deals with investors.

In the following article, we look at the benefits of online entrepreneurship courses in terms of obtaining financial support for a new business by understanding some key concepts taught in these programs.

How venture capitalists make their investment choices

Although they face huge risks, VCs make large bets on new, untested ventures in risky markets. To improve their chances of securing funding for their businesses, entrepreneurs should start by learning how angel investors and venture capitalists make their investment choices. The more criteria they can fulfill, the more likely they are to get investments. Here is a brief overview of the main considerations taken into account when evaluating a potential investment.

  1. Target market size

VCs typically place their bets on companies that will eventually target a large addressable market opportunity. Although “big” can be a subjective term, it usually means big returns worth several million or even more. The larger the target market, the greater the chances of obtaining financial support based on product demand. Entrepreneurs must demonstrate business plans that include “top-down” and “bottom-up” market size.

  1. Validation of the business idea

Commercial validation refers to the process of defining the need for a product in the target market. Validation helps entrepreneurs and investors reasonably predict whether the target audience will buy their products or services and whether the business will be profitable. Investors want to invest in great “disruptive” products and services that will retain a long-term competitive advantage. An online entrepreneurship course nurtures the creativity and critical thinking that helps students come up with such innovative products.

  1. Management skills

Investors don’t just invest in products – they invest in a plan and management’s ability to execute it effectively. Even if the company has a great product, the lack of talented managers can be a barrier to obtaining funding; they would rather invest in a mediocre idea led by accomplished management than a great idea led by ineffective managers. Entrepreneurs must demonstrate that they have strong management skills and can execute the business plan while mitigating losses in the process.

  1. Risk assessment

An investor’s job is to take risks; naturally, they will want to know what they are investing in during the early stages to avoid incurring huge losses. They assess risk based on multiple factors to measure, assess and mitigate risk and entrepreneurs will need to clearly demonstrate what their business has achieved or can achieve over 5 and 10 year time horizons.

What will you learn from an online entrepreneurship course?

  • The early-stage investing landscape

An entrepreneurship course is dedicated to providing critical insight into the investment landscape and how investors and venture capitalists evaluate businesses as investment opportunities. Students learn the importance of starting with a solid business plan that demonstrates management skills, the ability to read beyond the numbers in financial statements, create balance sheets, and more. Apart from economics, it also teaches various frameworks so that entrepreneurs can select a business. structure that best suits their unique proposition.

  • Various sources of capital

An online course in entrepreneurship also provides insight into the various options available to investors when raising capital for their early stage business. Students learn about the different sources of capital and the pros and cons of each source. Through formal training from experienced sources, students can learn to assess whether their business will benefit from incubators and accelerators or seeding. A good knowledge of the different sources of start-up financing greatly improves the chances of obtaining long-term financing.

  • Stages of the funding process

An online entrepreneurship program also provides information on how future business owners can formulate a comprehensive financing strategy. They learn about due diligence, how to assess the value of their business, how to negotiate term sheets, and how to establish common stock. Entrepreneurs with a solid understanding of the steps in the financing process can create a business plan that has a better chance of securing financing. Additionally, business owners can strive to obtain financing for the various stages of their business plan and maximize their working capital.

  • How to pitch to investors and close deals

As stated earlier, venture capitalists don’t just invest in one product. The entrepreneur must convince investors that his product is valid in the long term. An online course in entrepreneurship empowers individuals to tell a compelling story for their new venture using pragmatic advice on the do’s and don’ts of elevator pitching. You’ll learn about the most effective ways to tell your business story and how to combine that with your business idea to land a deal with an investor.

  • How to pitch to investors and close deals

As stated earlier, venture capitalists don’t just invest in one product. The entrepreneur must convince investors that his product is valid in the long term. An online entrepreneurship course empowers individuals to tell a compelling story for their new business with the help of pragmatic advice on the do’s and don’ts of elevator pitching. You’ll learn about the most effective ways to tell your business story and how to combine that with your business idea to land a deal with an investor.

Modern businesses focus a lot on corporate social responsibility (CSR). Investors are more likely to invest in ideas that develop society as a whole. In an entrepreneurial environment, previously unused resources, labor, and capital are used to drive innovation. Successful entrepreneurs usually strive to bring the latest technology to unfamiliar markets. Formal courses in entrepreneurial training and venture finance programs prepare students for their role in promoting social change on a global scale.

Online entrepreneurship courses are for aspiring and experienced professionals preparing for the funding round. That said, the skills learned in these courses are not only relevant for a career as an entrepreneur. It teaches various life skills that can be applied outside of business, which is crucial for the development of society as a whole. Several universities offer online courses in entrepreneurship that candidates can take at their own pace.

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Free online entrepreneurship course for people with disabilities https://shiawase-win.com/free-online-entrepreneurship-course-for-people-with-disabilities/ Mon, 13 Jun 2022 09:17:06 +0000 https://shiawase-win.com/free-online-entrepreneurship-course-for-people-with-disabilities/ Previous research from TU Dublin, which runs the course, has indicated that Ireland has one of the lowest employment rates in the EU for people with disabilities. TU Dublin is set to run a new entrepreneurship course for people with disabilities. The free course will take place entirely online and is designed to overcome the […]]]>

Previous research from TU Dublin, which runs the course, has indicated that Ireland has one of the lowest employment rates in the EU for people with disabilities.

TU Dublin is set to run a new entrepreneurship course for people with disabilities. The free course will take place entirely online and is designed to overcome the additional barriers people with disabilities face when starting or running their own business.

Participants will leave the course with the skills and knowledge to become self-employed. Each participant will also receive a business mentor through the Local Enterprise Office network. People who are already running their own business are not eligible as the program is focused on pre-startups.

TU Dublin runs the program in response to Previous search he did so in 2020. Professor Thomas Cooney and his Canadian co-author found that Ireland has one of the lowest employment rates in the EU for people with disabilities. The last census listed the figure as 26.2pc, which is more than double the rate of 12.9pc for the population as a whole. The EU average is 52 piecesaccording to Inclusion Europe.

The report highlighted the role that entrepreneurship could play in overcoming the many barriers people with disabilities face in accessing employment. However, at the last census, only 52,115 people with disabilities owned their own business.

Cooney, who designed and will lead the program, said “self-employment helps people with disabilities to participate socially and economically.”

“It also allows them to choose their own hours or work remotely, which gives them more flexibility than what can be found in paid employment. However, despite the benefits, there is limited awareness of self-employment as a career option for people with disabilities within their own community and within corporate agencies and disability advocacy organizations.

The course will be launched at an event hosted today (June 13) by the Open House Initiative. The Irish nonprofit is hosting a webinar on entrepreneurship for people with disabilities at the launch. He is co-founder and supporter of the program. Other organizations involved as supporters and partners are AIB, the Local Enterprise Office, Disability Federation of Ireland, DoTheFinancials.com, Microfinance Ireland and SimVenture.

Applications are currently open for the program. It’s free and starts September 21. It will last 12 weeks. More information on how to apply can be found on TU Dublin website.

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Boots to Business Veterans Entrepreneurship Course scheduled for June 7 https://shiawase-win.com/boots-to-business-veterans-entrepreneurship-course-scheduled-for-june-7/ Fri, 03 Jun 2022 07:00:00 +0000 https://shiawase-win.com/boots-to-business-veterans-entrepreneurship-course-scheduled-for-june-7/ NewJune 03, 2022 Boots to Business Veterans Entrepreneurship Course scheduled for June 7 Written by: Rachel Putman The Arkansas Small Business and Technology Center at the University of Arkansas at Fort Smith will host Boots to Business Reboot, an entrepreneurial education and training program specifically designed for veterans, active duty military personnel and their spouses. […]]]>

NewJune 03, 2022

Boots to Business Veterans Entrepreneurship Course scheduled for June 7

Written by: Rachel Putman

The Arkansas Small Business and Technology Center at the University of Arkansas at Fort Smith will host Boots to Business Reboot, an entrepreneurial education and training program specifically designed for veterans, active duty military personnel and their spouses.

The one-day Boots to Business program, offered by the US Small Business Administration and ASBTDC at UAFS, will take place Tuesday, June 7at the Bakery District Economic Development Center.

Those interested in registering can register at: https://asbtdc.ecenterdirect.com/events/70371359


“The River Valley is blessed with a strong veterans community that plays a vital role in the region’s growth and opportunities for all of us,” said Bill Sabo, ASBTDC Regional Director. “Whether a veteran wants to start their own business or expand an existing business, this program will give them the information they need to succeed in this region and a roadmap to success.”

Reboot participants are introduced to the skills, knowledge and resources needed to start a business, from developing a concept to creating a business plan. Information is also provided on useful SBA resources, and participants who complete the course can choose to further their education through other Boots to Business courses offered online for free.

Sabo will join Myron L. Pullum, outreach coordinator for the University of Texas at Arlington Veterans Business Outreach Center, and Herb Lawrence, veterans business development manager for the SBA’s Arkansas District Office, in as trainers for this session.

“I am happy to host this program,” Sabo said. “Whether it’s because of their military training and discipline or their drive for excellence, some of the most successful and driven entrepreneurs I work with are veterans.”

You will find more information about Boots to Business and other Reboot courses to continue learning on https://sbavets.force.com/s/

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Elon University / Today at Elon / Entrepreneurship course gives students opportunity to make a local impact https://shiawase-win.com/elon-university-today-at-elon-entrepreneurship-course-gives-students-opportunity-to-make-a-local-impact/ Tue, 31 May 2022 14:16:31 +0000 https://shiawase-win.com/elon-university-today-at-elon-entrepreneurship-course-gives-students-opportunity-to-make-a-local-impact/ Students in Elena Kennedy’s Entrepreneurship for the Greater Good course had the opportunity to research, create and consult with local professionals at four community partner organizations during the spring semester. Students of Elena Kennedy’s Entrepreneurship for the Greater Good course, Assistant Professor of Entrepreneurship, had the opportunity to research, create and consult with local professionals […]]]>

Students in Elena Kennedy’s Entrepreneurship for the Greater Good course had the opportunity to research, create and consult with local professionals at four community partner organizations during the spring semester.

Students of Elena Kennedy’s Entrepreneurship for the Greater Good course, Assistant Professor of Entrepreneurship, had the opportunity to research, create and consult with local professionals at four community partner organizations during the spring semester.

Their final projects addressed a variety of needs such as a promotion for local restaurants, collecting community data for a proposed social neighborhood and startup business listing app, and creating a fundraising campaign. funds.

Student groups have collaborated with partners such as the Burlington Downtown Corporation, EarlyGroove, Burlington Woman’s Club and Burlington Beer Works. Each group worked closely with their partner to analyze needs, conduct research, and create deliverables to be used to grow businesses in the region.

Kennedy, who also serves as Doherty Emerging Professor of Entrepreneurship, has taught the course for six years and intends to choose partners who exhibit more non-traditional aspects of entrepreneurship. For example, Burlington Beer Works is a cooperative-owned brewery and restaurant, founded and run by community members. The Burlington Woman’s Club is a non-profit organization that uses income from its thrift store to fund local causes and scholarships.

“A key facet of social innovation and social entrepreneurship is learning to listen to others. As many change advocates say, “those closest to the problem are also closest to the solution”, and it’s important that our students interact and work in partnership with people who are looking to create things in our community,” Kennedy said. “Our community partners also serve as great mentors for our students and challenge them in ways that are difficult to create in a traditional classroom.”

Peter Bishop, Director of Economic Development for the City of Burlington, attended the final presentations and was particularly impressed, noting, “Dr. Kennedy’s class provided professional-level analysis and information that will help the Burlington Downtown Corporation and our community to research options for creating a social neighborhood downtown. We are happy to use the report!

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Ivors Academy launches new creative entrepreneurship course TheWRD https://shiawase-win.com/ivors-academy-launches-new-creative-entrepreneurship-course-thewrd/ Thu, 19 May 2022 15:00:42 +0000 https://shiawase-win.com/ivors-academy-launches-new-creative-entrepreneurship-course-thewrd/ Ivors Academy has announced the launch of TheWRD, a new creative entrepreneurship course for students aged 19+. The two-year continuing education program, which is a UCAS-accredited and recognized course, is backed “by the biggest players in the music industry” according to The Ivors, which is an independent trade association of songwriters. -composers and composers. The […]]]>

Ivors Academy has announced the launch of TheWRD, a new creative entrepreneurship course for students aged 19+.

The two-year continuing education program, which is a UCAS-accredited and recognized course, is backed “by the biggest players in the music industry” according to The Ivors, which is an independent trade association of songwriters. -composers and composers.

The WRD will start in September and offer students the opportunity to study for a pre-degree degree in Creative Entrepreneurship, the program aimed at giving young people “the chance to build a career in this highly competitive industry”.

The course will consist of distance and in-person learning, including mentorship days at local music venues across the UK.

Students will be trained and mentored by a range of “music artists, publishers, producers, composers, technicians, marketers, business executives, lawyers, accountants, graphic designers, high-level publicists and agents”, according to A press release.

The course will be publicly funded for those who qualify or can be privately funded, while TheWRD also aims to form additional partnerships “to provide scholarships to cover the cost of the course”.

“The skills and knowledge students develop will create new opportunities whether they continue their education, start a career in music – in front of or behind the mic – or in another industry,” the press release adds. TheWRD.

Founding Director of TheWRD, Ian Mack, said in a statement: “TheWRD aims to give young creatives access to what they need, when they need it and at an affordable price. Students don’t want long, tedious lectures on irrelevant topics. They want premium, relevant content delivered in small chunks in immersive online experiences and through real-world mentoring in real locations.

“TheWRD is a safe and creative space where students can realize their potential.”

You can learn more about TheWRD by going here.

The Ivors Academy is hosting its annual songwriting awards ceremony today (May 19), featuring names like Adele, SAULT and Sam Fender.

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Historic course on entrepreneurship shows no signs of slowing down https://shiawase-win.com/historic-course-on-entrepreneurship-shows-no-signs-of-slowing-down/ Fri, 11 Mar 2022 08:00:00 +0000 https://shiawase-win.com/historic-course-on-entrepreneurship-shows-no-signs-of-slowing-down/ In a process that has been going on for more than 60 years at MIT, this week a group of students came together to practice entrepreneurship at a breakneck pace designed to mimic the steep learning curve needed to start a business. MIT’s 15.390 (New Ventures) course has been held annually since 1961 – a […]]]>

In a process that has been going on for more than 60 years at MIT, this week a group of students came together to practice entrepreneurship at a breakneck pace designed to mimic the steep learning curve needed to start a business.

MIT’s 15.390 (New Ventures) course has been held annually since 1961 – a time when entrepreneurship education was just an obscure idea. Indeed, many people believe that New Enterprises is the nation’s oldest entrepreneurship course, and its mark on the Institute and the greater Boston area has been profound.

Over the course of a semester, the project-based class challenges students to form teams, pursue business plans, and respond to feedback given during mock board meetings.

“The goal of the course is to prepare students for one of two things: maybe they want to pursue a startup and now they have a plan to put into practice, or maybe they are going to take that process and drop it off at another organization, whether as a researcher, an employee at a large corporation, or a non-profit,” says Paul Cheek, senior lecturer at the Sloan School of Management in MIT, which started teaching new businesses in 2020. “Whatever they do, they will go with entrepreneurship and skills.

The format is designed to create entrepreneurs, not businesses. Yet an impressive number of classroom projects have turned into successful businesses over the years. These companies then introduced impactful products to the world, became pillars of the local tech ecosystem, and pioneered new industries.

Bill Aulet, who has helped teach the course for the past 12 years as managing director of the Martin Trust Center for MIT Entrepreneurship, thinks New Enterprises exemplifies MIT’s culture of ensuring that classroom work has an impact on the world.

“When MIT started, it was a home for immigrants and children of immigrants who were part of the Industrial Revolution, so we still do things differently,” says Aulet, who is also a professor of practice at Sloan. MIT School of Management. “We have a deep culture of entrepreneurship. It’s been here for a long time, and when people say, “You’re doing a good job,” you have to say, “It was here before I came, and it will be here long after I’m gone.

A rich history

MIT was very different in 1961 than it is today. But a trend towards the commercialization of scientific research was evident after a world war in which physicists had played a decisive role, and a number of companies had managed to grow out of the huge wartime laboratories of MIT.

Richard Morse ’33, a lecturer in what was then called MIT’s School of Industrial Management, was among those who walked onto MIT’s bustling campus with a new idea in 1961. Morse had founded the National Research Corporation (NRC), best known for inventing frozen orange juice. concentrate and create the Minute Maid Corporation. He wanted to formalize the process of commercializing new technologies for students. New Enterprises was born.

Morse taught the class, which was limited to 15 students, with the help of outside professionals and contractors rather than professors. Over the years, the course has evolved to meet changing conditions and growing demand in the same way a business might.

After Morse, he was taught by Russell Olive ’52 and then Barbara Bund, who introduced entrepreneurial marketing to students. Professors Eric von Hippel ’68 and Ed Roberts taught for an interim period to accommodate the growing number of students applying. Over the next few decades, 20% of the class’s seats were reserved for engineering students, reflecting MIT’s highly interdisciplinary approach to entrepreneurship.

As students put what they had learned into practice, new companies began to play a formative role in the industries for which MIT and Cambridge are well known today. Among the first students of the course was Robert Swanson, who would go on to found Genentech, which developed synthetic insulin. The company is also widely credited with founding the biotechnology industry.

In the 1980s, Jon Hirschtick, who advanced computer-aided design (CAD) by founding companies such as SoldWorks and OnShape, wrote the business plan for his first company in New Ventures. Other successful entrepreneurs, including Aulet, who took the course as a student in 1993, credit Nouvelles Entreprises for teaching them the ropes of entrepreneurship.

More recently, the start-up of several anchor companies in the Boston area can be traced back to new ventures.

“I basically took New Enterprises twice,” says Brian Halligan MBA ’05, who co-founded Hubspot, the Cambridge-based marketing software giant, with Darmesh Shah SM ’06. “The first time, I worked on another idea. The following semester, Dharmesh followed him and we accompanied Hubspot throughout the course. I think it’s the best course I’ve ever taken.

Nowadays, the course begins by asking students to come up with business ideas. Instructors then run sessions around building teams, discovering and interviewing clients, and developing a business plan. Students have two mock board meetings throughout the semester, where experts give feedback on their plan and try to identify gaps they need to fill in their business.

The class is a melting pot of undergraduates, masters students, doctoral candidates and mid-career Sloan Scholars, as well as students from Harvard University and Wellesley College.

“It’s a fun and entertaining class,” says Cheek, who notes that students are graded on how well they apply the entrepreneurial concepts they are taught and how well they respond to feedback. “You look around the room and people are laughing and enjoying the process. It’s not just about “doing the work and going to class”. They also embrace the entrepreneurial spirit.

Continuing a Legacy

New Enterprises is designed to be the beginning of students’ entrepreneurial journey. Instructors often direct students to other entrepreneurial support offerings on campus when the semester is over, such as industry-specific entrepreneurship courses at Sloan or programs like the MIT Sandbox Fund, Legatum Center, and the Venture Mentoring Service.

No one really has a complete list of all the companies that have come out of new ventures, but Aulet says he’s often contacted by alumni who cite the course as a launching point for their business. Over the past few weeks, this has included the founding teams of Klarity and Lightmatter, who just raised an additional $98 million in capital to fund their continued growth.

“It’s incredibly gratifying to hear these entrepreneurs talk about their successes in making a positive impact on the world,” says Aulet.

Cheek says the fact that the course is now over 60 years old underscores the interdependence between MIT’s founding philosophy and the spirit of entrepreneurship.

“It’s so closely tied to MIT’s motto, ‘mens and mans’ [“mind and hand” in Latin]says Cheek. “Entrepreneurship is not just understanding, it is going through a process and practicing. This process has evolved over time. This class has iterated so many times to improve and increase the value of entrepreneurship education, and it’s something that definitely won’t stop.

/University release. This material from the original organization/authors may be ad hoc in nature, edited for clarity, style and length. The views and opinions expressed are those of the author or authors. See in full here.

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Historic entrepreneurship course shows no signs of slowing down | MIT News https://shiawase-win.com/historic-entrepreneurship-course-shows-no-signs-of-slowing-down-mit-news/ Fri, 11 Mar 2022 05:00:00 +0000 https://shiawase-win.com/historic-entrepreneurship-course-shows-no-signs-of-slowing-down-mit-news/ In a process that has been going on for more than 60 years at MIT, this week a group of students came together to practice entrepreneurship at a breakneck pace designed to mimic the steep learning curve needed to start a business. MIT’s 15.390 (New Ventures) course has been held annually since 1961 – a […]]]>

In a process that has been going on for more than 60 years at MIT, this week a group of students came together to practice entrepreneurship at a breakneck pace designed to mimic the steep learning curve needed to start a business.

MIT’s 15.390 (New Ventures) course has been held annually since 1961 – a time when entrepreneurship education was just an obscure idea. Indeed, many people believe that New Enterprises is the nation’s oldest entrepreneurship course, and its mark on the Institute and the greater Boston area has been profound.

Over the course of a semester, the project-based class challenges students to form teams, pursue business plans, and respond to feedback given during mock board meetings.

“The goal of the course is to prepare students for one of two things: maybe they want to pursue a startup and now they have a plan to put into practice, or maybe they are going to take that process and drop it off at another organization, whether as a researcher, an employee at a large corporation, or a non-profit,” says Paul Cheek, senior lecturer at the Sloan School of Management in MIT, which started teaching new businesses in 2020. “Whatever they do, they will go with entrepreneurship and skills.

The format is designed to create entrepreneurs, not businesses. Yet an impressive number of classroom projects have turned into successful businesses over the years. These companies then introduced impactful products to the world, became pillars of the local tech ecosystem, and pioneered new industries.

Bill Aulet, who has helped teach the course for the past 12 years as managing director of the Martin Trust Center for MIT Entrepreneurship, thinks New Enterprises exemplifies MIT’s culture of ensuring that classroom work has an impact on the world.

“When MIT started, it was a home for immigrants and children of immigrants who were part of the Industrial Revolution, so we still do things differently,” says Aulet, who is also a professor of practice at Sloan. MIT School of Management. “We have a deep culture of entrepreneurship. It’s been here for a long time, and when people say, “You’re doing a good job,” you have to say, “It was here before I came, and it will be here long after I’m gone.

A rich history

MIT was very different in 1961 than it is today. But a trend towards the commercialization of scientific research was evident after a world war in which physicists had played a decisive role, and a number of companies had managed to grow out of the huge wartime laboratories of MIT.

Richard Morse ’33, a lecturer in what was then called MIT’s School of Industrial Management, was among those who walked onto MIT’s bustling campus with a new idea in 1961. Morse had founded the National Research Corporation (NRC), best known for inventing frozen orange juice. concentrate and create the Minute Maid Corporation. He wanted to formalize the process of commercializing new technologies for students. New Enterprises was born.

Morse taught the class, which was limited to 15 students, with the help of outside professionals and contractors rather than professors. Over the years, the course has evolved to meet changing conditions and growing demand in the same way a business might.

After Morse, he was taught by Russell Olive ’52 and then Barbara Bund, who introduced entrepreneurial marketing to students. Professors Eric von Hippel ’68 and Ed Roberts taught for an interim period to accommodate the growing number of students applying. Over the next few decades, 20% of the class’s seats were reserved for engineering students, reflecting MIT’s highly interdisciplinary approach to entrepreneurship.

As students put what they had learned into practice, new companies began to play a formative role in the industries for which MIT and Cambridge are well known today. Among the first students of the course was Robert Swanson, who would go on to found Genentech, which developed synthetic insulin. The company is also widely credited with founding the biotechnology industry.

In the 1980s, Jon Hirschtick, who advanced computer-aided design (CAD) by founding companies such as SoldWorks and OnShape, wrote the business plan for his first company in New Ventures. Other successful entrepreneurs, including Aulet, who took the course as a student in 1993, credit Nouvelles Entreprises for teaching them the ropes of entrepreneurship.

More recently, the start-up of several anchor companies in the Boston area can be traced back to new ventures.

“I basically took New Enterprises twice,” says Brian Halligan MBA ’05, who co-founded Hubspot, the Cambridge-based marketing software giant, with Darmesh Shah SM ’06. “The first time, I worked on another idea. The following semester, Dharmesh followed him and we accompanied Hubspot throughout the course. I think it’s the best course I’ve ever taken.

Nowadays, the course begins by asking students to come up with business ideas. Instructors then run sessions around building teams, discovering and interviewing clients, and developing a business plan. Students have two mock board meetings throughout the semester, where experts give feedback on their plan and try to identify gaps they need to fill in their business.

The class is a melting pot of undergraduates, masters students, doctoral candidates and mid-career Sloan Scholars, as well as students from Harvard University and Wellesley College.

“It’s a fun and entertaining class,” says Cheek, who notes that students are graded on how well they apply the entrepreneurial concepts they are taught and how well they respond to feedback. “You look around the room and people are laughing and enjoying the process. It’s not just about “doing the work and going to class”. They also embrace the entrepreneurial spirit.

Continuing a Legacy

New Enterprises is designed to be the beginning of students’ entrepreneurial journey. Instructors often direct students to other entrepreneurial support offerings on campus when the semester is over, such as industry-specific entrepreneurship courses at Sloan or programs like the MIT Sandbox Fund, Legatum Center, and the Venture Mentoring Service.

Nobody really has a complete list of all the companies that have come out of new ventures, but Aulet says he’s often contacted by alumni who cite the course as a launching point for their business. Over the past few weeks, this has included the founding teams of Clarity and Light materialwho just raised an additional $98 million in capital to fund their continued growth.

“It’s incredibly gratifying to hear these entrepreneurs talk about their successes in making a positive impact on the world,” says Aulet.

Cheek says the fact that the course is now over 60 years old underscores the interdependence between MIT’s founding philosophy and the spirit of entrepreneurship.

“It’s so closely tied to MIT’s motto, ‘mens and mans’ [“mind and hand” in Latin]says Cheek. “Entrepreneurship is not just understanding, it is going through a process and practicing. This process has evolved over time. This class has iterated so many times to improve and increase the value of entrepreneurship education, and it is something that certainly does not stop.

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Clever Harvey Collaborates with Multiply Ventures to Launch Entrepreneurship Course for High School Teens – Punekar News https://shiawase-win.com/clever-harvey-collaborates-with-multiply-ventures-to-launch-entrepreneurship-course-for-high-school-teens-punekar-news/ Fri, 04 Mar 2022 18:00:34 +0000 https://shiawase-win.com/clever-harvey-collaborates-with-multiply-ventures-to-launch-entrepreneurship-course-for-high-school-teens-punekar-news/ India, March 2, 2022: To give teenagers an early glimpse into future careers, Clever Harvey has collaborated with Multiply Ventures to launch a new industry-certified course, “JuniorMBA Entrepreneurship”, specifically for secondary school students (Classes VIII to XII). The 15-day program aims to provide students with hands-on exposure to what startup founders do while learning how […]]]>

India, March 2, 2022: To give teenagers an early glimpse into future careers, Clever Harvey has collaborated with Multiply Ventures to launch a new industry-certified course, “JuniorMBA Entrepreneurship”, specifically for secondary school students (Classes VIII to XII).

The 15-day program aims to provide students with hands-on exposure to what startup founders do while learning how to create Shark Tank-style business presentations. Working in groups of two or three, students take a “behind the scenes” tour of one of the most challenging functions of business: entrepreneurship, guided by a Clever Harvey facilitator. By learning to develop business strategies with step-by-step guidance, students develop a solid foundation in business acumen and critical thinking.

Speaking at the launch of the new programme, Sriram Subramanian, co-founder of Clever Harvey, said: “With the introduction of the new education policy, the entrepreneurship and India’s burgeoning start-up culture makes it important for students to understand what goes into being an entrepreneur.The newly launched program teaches students how to start a business while reflecting on concepts such as value proposition, business models, revenue streams, business costs and scaling challenges. They then apply these concepts to present their own business plans. We are delighted to welcome Multiply Ventures as a as a partner in creating this new category of experiential career discovery. A team of former founders who created and scaled brands like Myntra, Flipkart and PayTm now serve as inve writers. Their contributions are invaluable for aspiring entrepreneurs – teenagers or adults.

“You would think that an entrepreneurship program is for those who want to start businesses. But did you know that 65% of the professions that will exist in 2030 have not yet been invented? So how do you prepare the younger generation for this world? There is a distinct need for an entrepreneurial skill set, regardless of career choice in today’s ever-changing business environment. Critical thinking, influencing skills and business acumen are key skills needed to be successful in any career they choose to pursue,” he added.

Commenting on the launch, Raveen Sastry, Founder of Multiply Ventures, said, “We are delighted to have partnered with Clever Harvey to teach entrepreneurial skills at the secondary level. Students will benefit from building a broader problem-solving mindset to understand people’s needs and develop solutions. Additionally, it will be interesting to see how students develop ideas and develop solutions to turn them into viable and scalable business plans. We are excited to see teen start-ups emerging from this program. »

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Clever Harvey and Multiply Ventures Collaborate on 15-Day Entrepreneurship Course for High School Teens https://shiawase-win.com/clever-harvey-and-multiply-ventures-collaborate-on-15-day-entrepreneurship-course-for-high-school-teens/ Wed, 02 Mar 2022 08:00:00 +0000 https://shiawase-win.com/clever-harvey-and-multiply-ventures-collaborate-on-15-day-entrepreneurship-course-for-high-school-teens/ Mr. Sriram Subramanian – Co-Founder, Clever Harvey The 15-day program gives students hands-on exposure to what startup founders do while learning how to create Shark Tank-style business presentations. To give teens an early glimpse into future careers, Clever Harvey has collaborated with Multiply Ventures to launch a new industry-certified course, ‘JuniorMBA Entrepreneurship,’ specifically for high […]]]>
Mr. Sriram Subramanian – Co-Founder, Clever Harvey

The 15-day program gives students hands-on exposure to what startup founders do while learning how to create Shark Tank-style business presentations.

To give teens an early glimpse into future careers, Clever Harvey has collaborated with Multiply Ventures to launch a new industry-certified course, ‘JuniorMBA Entrepreneurship,’ specifically for high school students (Classes VIII to XII).

The 15-day program aims to provide students with hands-on exposure to what startup founders do while learning how to create Shark Tank-style business presentations. Working in groups of two or three, students take a “behind the scenes” tour of one of the most challenging functions of business: entrepreneurship, guided by a Clever Harvey facilitator. By learning to develop business strategies with step-by-step guidance, students develop a solid foundation in business acumen and critical thinking.

Speaking on the launch of the new program, Sriram Subramanian, co-founder, Clever Harvey, said, “With the introduction of new education policy, entrepreneurship curriculum and booming start-up culture in India, it is important for students to understand what is going on. in being an entrepreneur. The newly launched program teaches students how to build a business while thinking about concepts such as value proposition, business models, revenue streams, business costs, and scaling challenges. They then apply these concepts to present their own business plans. We are thrilled to welcome Multiply Ventures as a partner in creating this new category of experiential career discovery. A team of former founders who created and scaled brands like Myntra, Flipkart and PayTm are now acting as investors. Their contributions are invaluable to aspiring entrepreneurs – teenagers or adults. »

“You would think that an entrepreneurship program is for those who want to start businesses. But did you know that 65% of the professions that will exist in 2030 have not yet been invented? So how do you prepare the younger generation for this world? There is a distinct need for an entrepreneurial skill set regardless of career choice in today’s ever-changing business environment. Critical thinking, influencing skills and business acumen are key skills needed to be successful in any career they choose to pursue,” he added.

Commenting on the launch, Raveen Sastry, founder of Multiply Ventures, said, “We are delighted to have partnered with Clever Harvey to teach entrepreneurial skills at the secondary level. Students will benefit from building a broader problem-solving mindset to understand people’s needs and develop solutions. Additionally, it will be interesting to see how students develop ideas and develop solutions to turn them into viable and scalable business plans. We are excited to see teen start-ups emerging from this program.”

About Clever Harvey:

Founded by Sriram Subramanian and Madhu Agrawal in 2020 as the D2C division of Callido Learning, the Mumbai-based company is building India’s largest career accelerator for teenagers. It currently offers programs for high school students in marketing, technology, entrepreneurship, data analytics, UX design, digital marketing, and finance in conjunction with leading companies like Puma, Samsonite, Dominos, Kellogg’s, Cult.Fit, and more.

The JuniorMBA Entrepreneurship program is the most popular option among parents looking to give their children a solid foundation in the business world. More than 10,000 students from 15 countries have graduated from these programs. Leading the next phase of expansion, Clever Harvey is now partnering with leading universities to create accelerated college admission pathways for high school students with a portfolio of industry projects.

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Drew University business students develop startup ideas in entrepreneurship class https://shiawase-win.com/drew-university-business-students-develop-startup-ideas-in-entrepreneurship-class/ Thu, 27 Jan 2022 03:05:10 +0000 https://shiawase-win.com/drew-university-business-students-develop-startup-ideas-in-entrepreneurship-class/ Tags: enterprise, Caspersen, CLA, Homepage, immersive, launch, students Drew University business students develop startup ideas in entrepreneurship class Fall 2021 projects inspire students to think big January 2022 – Eleven students from Drew University’s entrepreneurship class spent the fall 2021 semester developing a startup idea and accompanying pitch deck. To illuminate the many facets of […]]]>

Tags: enterprise, Caspersen, CLA, Homepage, immersive, launch, students

Drew University business students develop startup ideas in entrepreneurship class

Fall 2021 projects inspire students to think big

January 2022 – Eleven students from Drew University’s entrepreneurship class spent the fall 2021 semester developing a startup idea and accompanying pitch deck.

To illuminate the many facets of their business ideas, students learned key start-up concepts such as product-market fit, Level 5 leadership, total addressable market, go-to-market strategies, and the Lean Canvas. . They also read Peter Thiel’s bestseller, Zero to Oneand covered case studies on Tesla, Lululemon Athletica, Airbnb, Etsy, Uber, Rent the Runway and WeWork.

Some students created a fourth sector business — “for-profit” businesses that rely on the private sector to solve public sector problems. Others have been inspired by their personal experiences in the United States and abroad.

Here are some startup ideas:

Nicolas D’Eufemia C’22

Major: Media & Communications

Project: Finding a Guide

Nick is an avid angler who has been on dozens of guided fishing trips around the world. He developed a business concept, Find a guidewith a website and a mobile app. Find a guide connects experienced anglers dedicated to the sport of fishing with anglers looking to venture into new geographic areas. When traveling to fish, anglers often don’t know where or when to go, what gear to use, or what has worked best for other anglers. Experienced local guides can help you. Find a guide also provides a way for experienced anglers to profit from their knowledge without having to build and promote entire businesses. As part of his market validation research, Nick contacted world renowned angler Patrick Sébile for consultation. It also took into account the rise in popularity of fishing during COVID-19, including a 10% increase in the number of female fishermen. A fourth sector, or for-profit enterprise, Find a guide encourage and support the capture and release practices as part of its corporate mission.

Talha Ahsan Siddiqui C’21, G’24

Major: Commerce

Project: e-Bkye Jadea JV – The mobility revolution for Pakistan and Indonesia

As someone who had first-hand experience of the noisy, stuffy, emission-filled roads of Karachi and Jakarta, Talha developed his business idea around green mobility. His company, e-Byke Jadea JV, is reportedly bringing affordable electric motorcycles to cities across Asia by first expanding into Pakistan and Indonesia. For his electric motorcycle, he chose Yadea JV, a recognized brand that currently has a 98% market share in China. Its go-to-market plan includes manufacturing the bikes locally in Pakistan and Indonesia to cut costs. E-byke’s extensive green mobility ecosystem would include bike rentals, battery charging and swapping stations, and a network of franchised dealerships. After developing the initial dealer network, Talha would expand e-Byke Jadea JV to other Asian markets.

Sungoh C’22 Park

Major: Commerce

Project: All About Style

Sungoh has developed a commercial concept around a mobile application, All About Style, a peer-to-peer community network that connects hairdressers and clients with features that go way beyond booking hairdresser appointments. The app was inspired, in part, by the experience of one of Sungoh’s friends who had trouble explaining how he wanted his hair cut to a stylist. In his speech to the class, Sungoh mentioned that KaKao Hair Shop, a popular hair appointment app used in South Korea, is not available for small hair salons, which provides an opportunity for All About Style. Not only would All About Style showcasing trending hairstyles from around the world, it would maintain detailed stylist biographies so that consumers can easily find a qualified local stylist for the exact haircut they have in mind. The app would encourage community and dialogue among members. As part of its social mission, All About Style would provide free haircuts to underserved populations as well as free training for aspiring hairdressers.

Deyna N. Cubillos Rozo

Au Pair Program

Project: Mkt Easy

Deyna decided to tackle an important problem in Latin America, mainly the limited availability of resources for social projects that underserved populations desperately need. The organization of Deyna, easy market, would develop and manage a new crowdfunding platform to bypass traditional funding processes often mired in bureaucracy and corruption. Its peer-to-peer platform would connect donors with organizations seeking to improve social conditions in local Latin American communities by leveraging educational programs. From its home country of Colombia, Deyna’s organization would market the platform using local TV, radio and newspaper ads and try to attract interested parties. Once established in Colombia, easy market would move to Mexico and eventually the United States

Brianna Santiago C’22

Major: Psychology, Commerce

Project: Fly Kicks

Brianna spent the last summer working in a sneaker store answering customer questions. The frustration she witnessed when customers couldn’t properly describe the sneakers they were looking for inspired Brianna’s company, Flying kicks. A photo app designed to help consumers easily identify sneakers they may have seen around town, Flying kicks would determine the exact brand and model of sneakers from a photo. The app would locate the sneaker online for the user, provide price and available sizes by location. As part of its mission, Flying kicks would donate one pair of sneakers for every 100 pairs purchased on the app, and the company would also support the Finish Line Youth Foundation’s Special Olympics. Brianna is considering Flying kicks like having a customer service team to answer questions about sneakers and would like to eventually expand the app to other types of shoes including boots, heels and sandals.

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